Charity day a big success

Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.
Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.

Friends, family and rugby fans came out in force for a charity day to raise funds for Cancer Research at Brighouse Sports Club.

The first event of its kind was the brainchild of George Holland and TJ Moon and was well-supported by Brighouse Rangers Rugby League team.

Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.'Farrah-Leigh Williams, three, gets her face painted.

Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.'Farrah-Leigh Williams, three, gets her face painted.

The day was also to remember club stalwart Brian Hinchcliffe and to raise awareness of the disease after George’s dad Simon had been diagnosed with Myeloma.

“Myeloma is such a niche cancer and affects less than 1,000 people,” said George, 21. “I read in the Echo about another man who had Myeloma and to have two people in the same town the size of Brighouse is very rare.

“Cancer Research is a massive charity and a brilliant cause. The day was about raising awareness of Myeloma as it is a cancer that isn’t obvious and starts from the inside out.

“The day was a great success.”

Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.'Dad Gavin Pettifor with River Pettifor, two, left, and Mackenzie Pettifor, nine, tucking in to barbecued goodies.

Charity Rugby Day at Brighouse Sports and Social Club.'Dad Gavin Pettifor with River Pettifor, two, left, and Mackenzie Pettifor, nine, tucking in to barbecued goodies.

Starting at midday, the event at Russell Way saw a George Holland XI take on a team selected by Lee Robson.

There was a match between a New Zealand masters and Royal Air Force Masters side as well as family entertainment including barbecues, stalls, raffles, silent auction and bouncy castle.

“George wanted to get the old junior team back together and we managed to do that for the day,” said TJ, a player for Brighouse Rangers. “When I was speaking to players down at the club everyone was interested.

“With what happened to Brian, cancer is kind of a big thing down at the club.

“There was a really big turn out and we raised around £1,400. We are also looking to get a memorial bench for Brian.”

George, who has just graduated from the University of Central Lancashire with a degree in sports strength and conditioning said it was hoped it would become an annual event.

“I would love to do it again. People could come down watch one or two games and the RAF and Kiwi masters still play a good game and it makes it more interesting.”