Students make their own headlines

BBC News report day at Rastrick High. Pictured are teacher Katie Moylan, Hashmat Khan, Joe Holmes, Jack Saville, Tom Bennett and Sahil Pathak

BBC News report day at Rastrick High. Pictured are teacher Katie Moylan, Hashmat Khan, Joe Holmes, Jack Saville, Tom Bennett and Sahil Pathak

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BUDDING reporters at Rastrick High School turned their classrooms into newsrooms to take part in the BBC School News Report day.

The school in Field Top Road joined over 1,000 schools from across the UK in the project, run by the BBC.

The project aims to motivate secondary students to make and broadcast their own news to develop journalistic skills and become school reporters.

Preparation started when Brighouse Echo reporter, Michaela Maunders, visited the school to talk to the students about her work and to give an insight into a typical day, if one of those exactly existed.

She was quizzed by the students about what made a story, how to write one and what were her favourites.

On the day itself Michaela returned to the school to work with some of the classes to help the students research their topics, collect pictures, write, edit and proof read their stories before the 3pm deadline when it all went live on the BBC website.

Michaela said: “The students asked some really good questions and had obviously put a great deal of thought into what being a reporter is all about. On the news day itself the students came up with some fantastic ideas and covered a wide range of topics from the recent bus crash in Switzerland to Cheltenham and the Olympics. There are some potential reporters in the mist at Rastrick.”

Foundation Learning Tier co-ordinator Lorraine Walker, spoke to students about her work with some of the students who take part in Disport and she arranged for Georgina Oliver an ex-student to visit the school and talk about her hopes for a place at the London 2012 Paralympics.

Year 13 student, Rebecca Blaeford, who plays for Huddersfield Town Football Club, was interviewed about her passion for the sport and hopes for the future. And deputy leader in PE Jason Battye, was reported to be a secret international Aussie Rules star by two of the students who wrote about his background in the sport and his aim to play for Great Britain.

Teacher Katie Moylan said: “The students worked with enthusiasm and independence and, as a result, produced some exceptional work covering a variety of topics.

“Knowing that their work would appear on the internet motivated them all the more while giving them real, hands on experience of the media. It was a thoroughly enjoyable and beneficial day.”