Duke gives seal of approval at Millers

Millers Oils welcomed Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, to mark their achievement of receiving the Queen’s Enterprise Award.

The Duke visited the company on Rastrick Common and was given a tour of the facilities and unveiled the plaque.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, visits Millers Olis, Rastrick.'Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, with blender Peter Simmonite.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, visits Millers Olis, Rastrick.'Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, with blender Peter Simmonite.

He was also taken to see the new £500,000 Research and Development facility opened last year and develops nanodrive engine oil technology.

Nevil Hall, joint managing director, said: “Receiving royal recognition for our innovative work in oil development is a great honour for Millers Oils.

“We feel very privileged to be able to demonstrate to The Duke of Kent, the expertise which supports the company’s on-going development and how this leads to the production of market-leading products such as our Nanodrive range.

“Winning awards like this helps us to put oil back on the map, and increase awareness of how important it is for oil development to keep pace with advances in modern drivetrain technology.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, visits Millers Olis, Rastrick.

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, visits Millers Olis, Rastrick.

“We want to get people thinking about oils and what is the most suitable and efficient product for their car.

“The visit means a great deal to us and recognises the work of everyone involved.”

Millers Oils was founded in 1887 by John Watson Miller, since then the company has displayed a talent for innovation and industry firsts. It was the first to offer diesel specific engine oil for cars.

Steve Woollven, sales and marketing director, said the Prince was keen to find out more about the company due to his love of vintage cars.

“He was really interested about the company especially with the technology to try and improve how oil is used and manufactured.

“He was very knowledgeable and didn’t skip any parts when he was going around so he could speak to everyone and was impressed with the way the company was trying to do.”