Echoes of the past: Pieces from local history to appear on eBay

In this featured photograph taken at the Lightcliffe cricket ground in Wakefield Road we see a group of supporters helping to erect the nets
In this featured photograph taken at the Lightcliffe cricket ground in Wakefield Road we see a group of supporters helping to erect the nets

Over the years I have written about just some of the amazing pieces of local history and sometimes personal pieces of memorabilia that appear on eBay.

Here are a few classic examples I found recently.

I keep being told ‘Chris you cannot save everything’... well I try to.

Some of the things that families dispose of when a loved one has passed away are often surprising. The television programme ‘Flog It’ often illustrates this best with some of the family items that are put up for sale.

Recently a church baptismal certificate came up for auction. Not something that would attract much attention you would think, but there are collectors of such things. With little interest shown and no one bidding for it, I decided to have a closer look at it.

This certificate from St Matthew’s Church at Lightcliffe was presented to Ernest and Lottie Booth on July 19, 1916 following the baptism of their son Lewis. As soon as I saw it I recognised the name, Lewis Booth, I know him.

In this featured photograph taken at the Lightcliffe cricket ground in Wakefield Road, we see a group of supporters helping to erect the nets.

From the left: Alan Warren (captain), George Thompson (president), Herbert Aspinall (secretary), Geoff Crook (who passed away quite recently), Ken Fielding leaning over Harry Marsden. April 1967, just before the start of the season. The man holding on to the upright pole with his right hand and wearing a cap is the same Lewis Booth.

An enquiry with Bob Horne, the well known Lightcliffe cricket enthusiast, retired player and these days a published author and poet well remembers Lewis. Whilst he never actually played for the club, he was one of those people often referred to one of the all important back-room boys.

He would be a committee member, a regular face seen as the gateman taking visiting spectators two bob entrance fee and scrutinising members membership cards - no freebies when Lewis was on the gate.

Always on hand to help with any small job that needed doing to help maintain the club’s well being.

Lewis not only attended every home game, he also regularly joined the team outside Barron’s newsagents in Victoria Road, Bailiff Bridge, the regular meeting place for away games, when non-driving Lewis was assured of a lift to the away game.

Back in the 1970s and 80s I would often walk down Wakefield Road, me working and Lewis making his way home.

He would raise a smile ask how I was and then begin to dissect the match into it great detail. How the team had won, and even what he felt they could have done to actually win the match.

Lewis would have been a regular face at the ground probably back in the 1950s when almost all the village would have attended. With far less entertainment opportunities back in those days, the local cricket club was a real focal point at the weekend. I can’t remember the last time Lewis and I shared a walk down Wakefield Road, but if he was alive today would be 100. From the available research resources it appears that Lewis passed away in the 1990s in his late 70s. A quite man who held the local cricket at Lightcliffe always close to his heart.