Echoes of the past: Brighouse enjoys St George’s Day

The St Georges Day procession in 1991 making its way towards the roundabout at the bottom of Halifax Road
The St Georges Day procession in 1991 making its way towards the roundabout at the bottom of Halifax Road

Almost another year has gone by and it will soon be St George’s Day again, when we remember England’s patron saint.

The anniversary of his death, which is on April 23, is seen as England’s national day.

He is believed to have been born in Cappadocia, which is now part of Turkey, and he was not an Englishman.

He was born into a noble Christian family in the third century, and followed his father by joining the Roman army.

It is suggested that when the Emperor ordered the persecution of Christians, George would not take part. This resulted in him being tortured and ultimately executed. Before he was killed he donated all of his wealth to the poor. George was later recognised as an early Christian martyr.

The legend of St George, clad in armour, slaying a dragon and rescuing a maiden, was a medieval invention.

It used to be a bank holiday in England, some have asked why is it not one now, whilst a number of reasons have been put forward, one of them is that in 2012 it was calculated by the Centre for Economic and Business Research it would cost the UK £2.4b in lost work.

St George’s Day will be celebrated with parades, dancing and other activities. Flags with the image of St George’s cross are flown on some buildings, especially pubs, and a few people wear a red rose on their lapel.

Church services often include the hymn ‘Jerusalem’, written by the poet William Blake.

Our featured photograph dates back to St George’s Day 1991, with the procession making its way towards the roundabout at the bottom of Halifax Road.

With not a lot of sunshine in sight it was probably a cold day for these youngsters but one I am sure they will still remember.